Scholarship

This section is under construction. We hope to develop a resource that showcases the diverse expertise and scholarly outputs of people with care experienced people, helping to counter the low aspirations many people have, or had, of us.

Capes, K. (2017). Popular perceptions of disrupted childhoods. Soundings, (67), 90–102.

Goddard, J., & Feast, J., & Kirton, D. (2008). A Childhood on Paper: Managing Access to Child Care Files by Post-Care Adults. Adoption & Fostering Journal, 32, 50-62. 

Goddard, J., & Feast, J., & Kirton, D. (2007). Memories, Childhood and Professional Power: Accessing the Care Files of Former Children in Care. In Robinson, D., Kelly, N., Milnes, K. (Eds.) Narrative and Memory: Selected papers from the sixth annual conference.

Goddard, J., Feast, J., & Kirton, D. (2005). A Childhood on Paper: Accessing Care Records under the Data Protection Act 1998. Adoption & Fostering29(3), 82–84.

Golding, F. (2019) “Problems with records and recordkeeping practices are not confined to the past”: a challenge from the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, Archival Science, April 2019.

Golding, F. &Wilson, J. (2019).  Lost and Found: Counter-Narratives of Dis/Located Children in Kristine Moruzi, Nell Musgrove & Carla Pascoe Leahy (eds.) Children’s Voices from the Past: New historical and interdisciplinary perspectives, Palgrave Macmillan. 

Golding, F. (2018). Sexual Abuse as the Core Transgression of Childhood Innocence: Unintended consequences for Care leavers, Journal of Australian Studies, 42(2).  

Golding, F. (2016). The Care Leaver’s perspective. Archives and Manuscripts, 44(3) 160-164. Published online: 12 Jan 2017, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01576895.2016.1266954

Wilson, J. Z & Frank Golding (2016). Latent scrutiny: Personal archives as perpetual mementos of the official gaze. Archival Science, 16(1, 93-109 DOI 10.1007/s10502-015-9255-3.

Wilson, J. Z. & Frank Golding (2016). Muddling Upwards: The Unexpected, Unpredictable and Strange on the Path from Care to High Achievement in Victoria, Australia. In Mendes, Philip & Snow, Pamela (Eds) (2016). Young People Transitioning from Out-of-Home Care: International Research, Policy and Practice, Palgrave McMillan, London.

Wilson, J.Z & Frank Golding (2015). Contested memories: Caring about the past – or past caring? In Johanna Sköld & Shurlee Swain (eds.) (2015). Apologies and the Legacy of Abuse of Children in ‘Care’, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Musgrove, N. & Michell, D. (2018), D. The Slow Evolution of Foster Care in Australia. Just Like a Family? London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Michell, D., Szabo, C., Falkner, K., & Szorenyi, A. (2018). Towards a Socio-Ecological Framework to address gender inequity in computer science. Computers and Education, 126, 324-333. 

Michell, D., Szorenyi, A., Falkner, K., & Szabo, C. (2017). Broadening participation not border protection: how universities can support women in computer science. Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, 39(4), 406-422. 

Michell, D., Beddoe, L., Fraser, H., & Jarldorn, M. (2017). Solidarity and support: feminist memory work focus groups with working-class women studying social science degrees in Australia. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 30(2), 175-189.

Michell, D. (2016). Dear Miss Spence: An Open Letter to Catherine Helen Spence (1825-1910). Life Writing, 13(4), 481-492.

Michell, D. (2015). Foster care, stigma, and the sturdy, unkillable children of the very poor. Continuum: Journal of Media and Cultural Studies, 29(4), 663-676. 

Michell, D. (2014). Healing and happiness in the Christian Science tradition. Feminist Theology, 22(2), 203-212.

Michell, D. E. (2014). Cautionary Tales. Review of The Market in Babies: Stories of Australian Adoption. History Australia, 11(2), 271-273.

Michell, D. (2012). A suddenly desirable demographic?: care leavers in higher education. Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal, 2012(33), 44-58.

Michell, D. E. (2011). An Interrupted Pathway. Australian Universities’ Review53(1), 89-93.


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